Posts Tagged ‘knockout’

Wilder vs Stiverne 2 - November 4_ 2017_11_04_2017_Fight_Ryan Hafey _ Premier Boxing Champions

Photo Credit: Ryan Haney/Premier Boxing Champions

BROOKLYN — Deontay Wilder said before last night’s rematch he feared for Bermane Stiverne’s life. Two minutes and 59 seconds later, we found out why as Stiverne failed to land a single punch and was on the receiving end of three knockdowns before being left motionless at the Barclays Center.

At 39 years old and having not fought in two years, most weren’t expecting much from Stiverne. Wilder wisely pounced on him early, showing a sharp jab. As Stiverne tried to plod in, his guard was split by an accurate straight right that put the former titlist on the seat of his pants. Any semblance of fighting spirit left Stiverne as he vainly claimed it was a rabbit punch. Wilder taunted him with a statue pose before unleashing two haymaker left and right hooks for another knockdown seconds later.

With under 10 seconds left, Wilder landing a sliding right hook and two left hooks that put Stiverne out cold against the bottom of the ropes.

Wilder’s win now gives him the distinction of knocking out every man he’s ever faced. In the post-fight interview, he challenged Anthony Joshua, who he accused of using performing enhancing drugs. Wilder also rebuffed the public offer from Joshua’s promoter Matchroom Boxing, who want him to face Dillian Whyte to earn a Joshua unification.Wilder did acquiesce that he would be willing to travel to the UK for Joshua.

Last night’s knockout was Wilder’s sixth successful defense of the WBC heavyweight title.

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A good knockout can make you forget the details. Stiverne was a dead man walking the minute this fight was announced. Shopworn, 39 years old, and inactive for two years (and in his last fight, was dropped), Stiverne was facing a man in Wilder at the peak of his physical powers and it showed quickly.

But the fact Wilder scored a huge KO, and Joshua seemed to “struggle” a week ago vs. Carlos Takam, has led some to claim not only will Wilder win, but that AJ is ducking the American champion.

When comparing resumes, Joshua holds the clear advantage. If Wladimir Klitschko was washed up, then Stiverne was the walking dead. And even more ironic is that Wilder’s next opponent is likely Dominic Breazeale, a man Joshua easily knocked out in seven rounds last year.

Now make no mistake, the fight needs to happen to unify the division. But Wilder has to realize he has zero leverage. Last night’s win was not even a sellout, while Joshua easily filled and set an indoor boxing record of over 70,000 with a replacement opponent in Takam. Much like Canelo-GGG, Joshua has all the cards and can delay the fight or have Wilder jump through as many hoops as he pleases.

Don’t expect this fight to happen until late 2018, early 2019 at the latest.

 

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Machado_Corrales

Photo Credit: Matt Heasley/ Golden Boy Promotions

VERONA, NY — Puerto Rico has a new world champion and a lineal one at that. Alberto Machado looked overmatched and outgunned before landing an eraser left hook to put down favorite Jezreel Corrales at the Turning Stone Casino.

Machado, who had never gone ten rounds nor faced a fighter of Corrales’ pedigree, struggled with his opponent’s explosiveness and wild attacks. But a glimmer of hope could be seen early on — Machado occasionally time a counter hook that would stop Corrales in his tracks.

It would be Machado who  first tasted the canvas in the fifth off a haymaker southpaw left. Machado weathered the storm and hurt Corrales badly with a short hook in the sixth. Corrales would hold on for the rest of the round, but the larger Machado extracted a price for this tactic by placing a forearm in Corrales’ throat every time.

After a tit for tat seventh with hard-fought but sloppy exchanges, Machado landed a short left hook that Corrales did not see coming. The champion slumped to the canvas and barely beat the count on unsteady legs. The referee ruled him unfit to canvas despite the protests.

After Corrales failed to make weight for this bout, I started to feel like maybe his Uchiyama victories were simply the result of being in the right place and at the right time against a declining champion. Since then he’s looked nothing like the guy some expected to be a force at super featherweight. He was floored twice by journeyman Robinson Castellanos and barely escaped with a technical decision win. Tonight, we was even more so reckless with his defense and attacks against Machado and it cost him dearly.

Corrales was vocal about wanting a rematch, but I don’t see how it’s feasible if he can’t make 130 safely. Plus, this bout wasn’t exactly eye-pleasing. The late exchanges and drama don’t make up for a first half mostly filled with awkward cliching and clumsy punching.

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UNDERCARD RESULTS

Andrade_Fox

 

DEMETRIUS ANDRADE UD12 ALANTEZ FOX: Andrade’s career-reboot continued last night with a lopsided unanimous decision. Fox was severly outclassed, landing less than 60 punches over the entire fight. While not an exciting bout, it was one that showed why most observers feel Andrade has untapped potential: length, punch accuracy and an excellent jab from the southpaw stance. Outside of a questionable knockdown, Andrade dominated. This was the first time he’s fought twice in a calendar year since 2013, so to state he needs to keep active is an understatement. With HBO’s backing, I’m expecting Andrade to be in the mix for bouts against the 160 elite by this time next year.

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RYAN BURNETT UD12 ZHANAT ZHAKIYANOV: This was a good fight to introduce U.S. fans to Ryan Burnett. The 25-year-old from Belfast, Ireland had a tough out against a bull of a fighter in Zhakiyanov, but the boxed well and battled in the trenches when necesssary. The scores rewarded his varied attack and skill (119-109, 118-110, 116-112). Now he’s a unified champion with the WBA and IBF super bantamweight titles. None of the top fighters in the division are locked up by the PBC or Showtime, so this is division, much like super flyweight, that HBO can showcase exclusively.

LR_WBSS-FIGHT NIGHT-GASSIEV VS WLODARCZYK-TRAPPFOTOS-10212017-3539

Photo Credit: Stephanie Trapp/ Ringstar Sports

NEWARK — Murat Gassiev ended the World Boxing Super Series quarter-finals with a crushing third round stoppage of Krzysztof Wlodarczyk at the Prudential Center.

Gassiev stalked his foe behind a tight guard from the opening bell. Wlodarczyk tried to implement a countering strategy off the backfoot, but his ponderous movement allowed Gassiev to cut the ring off and line up the right cross. With his opponent now focused on that punch, Gassiev uncorked a double left hook to the head and body that put Wlodarczyk flat on his face for the ten count.

“I had a great opponent tonight,” said Gassiev. “I prepared myself for a tough fight but it is boxing and anything can happen. We do a lot of work in the gym and I just listened to my coach round after round and he told me what I needed to do. That’s all I needed.”

Gassiev’s semi-final opponent is a fellow undefeated power-puncher and IBF titlist Yunier Dorticos, who knocked out Dmitry Kudryashov last month.

“Dorticos is a very good fighter with great experience,” said Gassiev. “He’s undefeated and I can’t wait to give all the boxing fans the big gift of a great fight against Dorticos.”

Dorticos, who believes Gassiev’s record is the product of weak opposition, vowed to add Gassiev’s WBA strap to his collection.

“I really wanted Gassiev to win, because he’s going to taste the power of a real man against me,” said Dorticos. “His opponent tonight was past his time. I’m ready to show him what a champion looks like and give him a challenge he’s never faced before. I want to take his belt. I want to get in the ring and destroy Gassiev.”

Gassiev improves his record to 25-0 (18 KOs). The semi-final unification matchup between Gassiev and Dorticos is targeted for early 2018.

Dorticos_Khudryashov_KO

SAN ANTONIO — The quarterfinal World Boxing Super Series battle between punchers Yunier Dorticos and Dmitry Kudrayshov ended swiftly and in brutal fashion with Dorticos’s right hand earning him a second-round KO last night at the Alamodome.

The fighters spent much of the first round exchanging power shots behind high guards. Dorticos scored most of his points by penetrating the guard with straight and overhand rights. In contrast, Khudryashov exploited Dorticos’ high hands by going to the body with short hooks.

Dorticos started quickly in the second with clusters of power shots that forced Khudryashov to give ground and exchange for breathing room. Within a minute, Dorticos’ faster hands were controlling the action.

Khudryashov made the fatal mistake of throwing a lingering jab. Dorticos came over the top with a snapping overhand right that sent Khudryashov to the canvas. With eyes rolling and rubbery legs, Khudryashov was ruled unfit to continue with 51 seconds remaining.

The victory comes in Dorticos’ first bout since defeating Youri Kalenga by knockout in May 2016. He advances to the WBSS semifinals and will face the winner of Murat Gassiev (IBF champion) vs. Krzysztof Wlodarczyk, taking place on October 21.

 

 

Mayweather_McGregor_punch

LAS VEGAS — Floyd Mayweather made good on his promise to not go the distance by walking down boxing novice Conor McGregor in route to a 10th round TKO.

Mayweather allowed McGregor to take the lead over the first three rounds. The MMA star flashed a decent jab and even caught an advancing Mayweather with a counter uppercut in the opening stanza. But any hope McGregor’s fans had of a monumental upset began evaporating in the fourth as Mayweather became aggressive and unleashed hooks to the body. McGregor was noticeably uncomfortable with the pressure and resorted with grappling and hammer fist rabbit punches.

McGregor tried to anticipate Mayweather’s offense by watching his hands, but that simply lead to Mayweather using feints to set up lead rights. By the middle rounds, McGregor’s labored breathing told the story of the constant pressure and fighting for the first time beyond five rounds. When McGregor attempted to hold, Mayweather now dug his forearm into his opponent’s throat to put him in range for more right hands.

After nearly being stopped in the ninth, McGregor was on his last legs and unable to defend himself. Mayweather pounced early in the 10th and forced the referee stoppage as the fatigue and punch accuracy left McGregor languishing on the ropes.

Mayweather, who vowed this would be his last fight, leaves the ring undefeated at 50-0.

 

Derevyanchenko_Johnson

Photo Credit: Gary Crow/Premier Boxing Champions

MIAMI — There is another middleweight destroyer rising up the ranks. Sergiy Derevyanchenko cemented himself as a contender and possible future title-challenger to Gennady Golovkin or Canelo Alvarez with a 12th round knockout of Tureano Johnson last night at the Buffalo Run Casino.

Derevyanhenko made the swarming Johnson pay for his aggression by using lateral movement to get heavy hooks and uppercuts around the guard. The Ukranian also varied his offense between light, setup punches inside that lulled Johnson into a false sense of security before unleashing power shots.

The pace was grueling with both men alternating between weary moments, but Derevyanchenko’s superior power wore down Johnson, who was hurt badly in rounds three and eleven before crumbling in the 12th behind a barrage of hooks.

The win was an IBF title eliminator, and the 31-year old feels he’s ready for the winner of Golovkin-Canelo next month.

“I’m ready to fight the winner of Golovkin vs. Canelo for the title,” said Derevyanchenko. “I think Golovkin will win and I look forward to fighting him next.”

The win improves Derevyanchenko’s record to 11-0 (9 KOs).

 

Ward 2

Photo Credit: Hogan Photos

Sergey Kovalev promised to end Andre Ward’s career. He vowed that the man he renamed “Son of Judges” wouldn’t get the chance to be saved by favorable scorecards. Today, it is the Krusher’s future that is in doubt following a dramatic and controversial eighth round stoppage loss at the Mandalay Bay. The tagline going into the fight was “no excuses,” and yet less than 24 hours removed, Kovalev and his promoter Main Events are preparing to protest the verdict and prolong the war of words between the camps. Unfortunately for Kovalev, the narrative that played out last night in the ring coupled with historical precedent does not bode well for his hopes of a reversal.

The rounds preceding the knockout showed both men were well-prepared. Ward did not repeat the sluggish start of the first bout; he looked for left hook counters upstairs to stifle Kovalev’s rushes and body work within clinches. Kovalev, now respectful of Ward’s ability, emphasized a higher work rate to counter Ward’s accuracy and inside work.

The fight was a nip-tuck affair with neither man jumping out to significant advantages. If Ward landed a good body shot, Kovalev was right back with several hard, clean jabs. If Kovalev got in a sneaky right, Ward returned the favor by getting right in his chest to maul and work the body.

As with any Ward fight, this wasn’t a clean affair. The clinching resulted in headlocks and rabbit punches from Kovalev, and borderline to clearly low blow shots from Ward. However, Ward was the more comfortable man in this domain — Kovalev’s complaints were more demonstrative and with expectations that he’d be given time to recover.

After seven rounds, my scorecard reflected an even fight (67-67), but not my eyes. Kovalev had noticeably become more labored in his breathing. His punches lacked its usual snap while Ward, never a huge puncher even at his prime weight of 168, looked more powerful and determined.

A right cross in the eighth badly hurt Kovalev. His attempts to hold were shrugged off with additional body shots. Kovalev sagged into the ropes, where Ward pounced on his doubled over opponent with shots that ranged from borderline to low. Assessing Kovalev’s body meek body language and no return punches, referee Tony Weeks opted to stop the contest. There was no protest from the former champion. 

This brings us to the big controversy of the night. Was Kovalev robbed by the non-call on the low-blow? His promoter, Kathy Duva, seems to think so. In the post-fight circus of a press conference, she was absolutely livid.

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Here’s the big problem that Duva and Kovalev will run into on Monday. There isn’t boxing commission in the world that would have the balls to reverse a decision in a fight of this magnitude. Look no further than the undercard bout against Rigondeaux and Flores (where referee Vic Drakulich and the commissioner look absolutely terrified to make the call between a DQ, No Contest or KO).

Even more daunting is the last time Main Events filed a low blow protest. In 2011, the company was promoting Zab Judah, in the midst of one of his many comebacks, this time against Amir Khan. Judah was thoroughly dominated in every round. In the fifth, a bloody Zab was grappling with Khan in a clinch and bent forward, much like Kovalev last night. Khan fired a borderline shot that resulted in the KO. Main Events filed a protest with Nevada, the WBA and IBF that went on deaf ears to the point we never heard another word about it.

Like any sport, boxing is predicated on momentum. In basketball, teams that go on runs seem to get all the calls while the losing team’s complaints are often ignored. If your getting hands placed on you in the ring, your complaints will come off as looking for a way out, leading to a referee making a quick call like we saw last night. It’s also important to note that unintentional fouls caused by the fighters movements are usually not acknowledged. Case in point — if I’m constantly bending down and away from an opponent, resulting in boderline rabbit shots to the top/side of the head, I’m going to be the one the ref will admonish for causing the “illegal” blow. Check out the KO years back of Glen Johnson on a crouching Allan Green who complains of a rabbit punch.

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There are certain realities you need to accept when you face certain fighters. Against Bernard Hopkins, be prepared for a night of mauling, sneaky low blows and butts. Evander Holyfield? Again, watch the butts. After 12 rounds against Andre Ward last November, Sergey Kovalev said he was prepared for the rematch, going as far as to say Ward was overrated and he had trained too hard. But last night showed that the Krusher had neither the mental nor physical ability to handle a rough and tumble fight where he couldn’t be the frontrunner.

“I was breathing, he was breathing, but I’m used to working tired,” said Ward. “I’m comfortable being uncomfortable; that’s how we work, that’s how we train. When I saw him put his arms on the ropes in between the rounds – I watch all that stuff – that’s trouble for him. I just needed to keep being smart… I think it was plain to see that I broke him mentally and physically.”

Consider the Ward-Kovalev rivalry closed.