Posts Tagged ‘knockout’

Higa_Fuentes

Photo Credit: KYODO

Daigo Higa is a name you’ll want to remember. The undefeated 22-year-old improved to 15-0 (15 KOs) with a devastating stoppage of Moises Fuentes in just 2 minutes and 32 seconds.

Although Fuentes came into the fight having lost two of his last three fights, he avenged one of those defeats and had never been dominated in this fashion. The shorter Higa stunned him with a short right hook at the 1:15 mark. Fuentes was trapped on the ropes and absorbed several more right and left hooks before getting put down by a straight right to the body. He appeared to beat the count, but the referee waived off the contest amidst Fuentes’s protests.

Higa’s 15th straight knockout ties a national record for Japanese fighters. In addition, the win marks the second successful defense of his WBC World flyweight title. Fuentes falls to 25-5-1, having lost three of his last four bouts dating back to December 2016.

Advertisements

Spence_Peterson_punch

Photo Credit: Amanda Wescott/Showtime

BROOKLYN — The great thing about the truth is it’s uncompromising. Emotionless. That reality manifested last night at the Barclays Center in the form of Errol Spence Jr., who showed why he’s the most feared man in the welterweight division by breaking the will of Lamont Peterson over seven one-sided rounds.

With both men having fought once in the last year, the big question was who would show more ring rust and if Spence could handle the Jekyll-Hyde style of Peterson, who likes to apply heavy pressure after slow starts. Spence not only breezed through that test but revealed other truths which will be very concerning for the rest of the division.

CERTAIN DOOM: If you stand in front of Spence, bad things will happen. Peterson tried to wear out his foe by keeping a high guard and catching punches on the gloves and elbows. The problem was the southpaw Spence’s offense was too versatile; he alternated between shooting straight lefts to the pit of the stomach, uppercuts that split the gloves, and looping hooks around the guard. These shots kept Peterson hesitant to throw more than one counter at a time. And these were powerful, thudding shots you could tell were wearing down the reserves to prevent Peterson’s usual middle rounds comeback.

Spence_Peterson_knockdown

YOU CAN’T SLUG YOUR WAY OUT: Peterson went down off a left hook to the top of the temple. The shot whipped around his guard and he didn’t see it coming. Peterson has been dropped eight times over the course of his 14-year. The Matthysse loss aside, he’s got up and prevented KO losses by turning the contest into brief slugfests. Last night, that strategy invited a worse beating for the D.C. challenger, who witnessed Spence smile and shrug off his best right hands to maul him with powerful hooks. When Peterson stumbled into the ropes, the beating continued with uppercuts and more hooks.

The severity of the punches and lack of Peterson return fire let us know this time would be different. There would be no last hurrahs for Peterson. The one remaining question was if his corner would be perceptive enough to realize when they needed to save Peterson from himself.

 

AN HONORABLE TRAINER: Peterson’s cornerman, Barry Hunter, is more than just a trainer. He was the man who took a teenage, homeless Peterson off the streets of Washington D.C. Father and son-like relationships don’t always lead to the best decisions in the heat of combat. Many times, the father figure “freezes” and either fails to give adequate instructions to his losing fighter or lets a beating go on for too long.

Hunter saw the writing on the wall early and told his man by the fifth he’d stop it if he couldn’t turn the fight around. The beating continued through the sixth and seventh, with a dejected Peterson telling Hunter that he couldn’t box him and his only hope was making it a slugfest. Hunter asked him if he wanted to stop it. And the prideful Peterson affirmed the hopelessness of the situation while still relying on his father figure to make the hurtful call.

“If you want to stop it, I understand. It’s your call.”

Having never heard anything close to that over Peterson’s career, Hunter knew his man had enough.

WELTERWEIGHT SUPREMACY IS UPON US: In his post-fight interview, Spence affirmed his desire for a unification showdown with WBC title-holder Keith Thurman, whom he derisively referred to as “Sometimes Thurman.” The match is one of the biggest showdown in the division and between two undefeated, prime fighters both under the PBC banner. To this date, Thurman has been non-committal and appeared comfortable with letting the fight “marinate” until 2019. The public won’t allow that, and there’s nothing that can happen between now and 2019 that would suddenly make either of them pay-per-view stars.

Its actually fights like Spence-Thurman that can catapult a fighter into becoming an pay-per-view attraction. Spence has the ambition to bet on himself and take the risk now. Does Thurman?

THE REAL SUPERFIGHT FOR 2019: If there’s any fight that I would accept waiting next year for, it would be Spence taking on Terence Crawford, who has his own welterweight title shot in April when he takes on WBO title-holder Jeff Horn. With Crawford under Top Rank and Spence with Al Haymon, the promotional rift will keep them separated for some time. Should Spence beat Thurman, he would still have guys like Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter to tangle with. And Crawford can feast on the endless list of WBO mandatories and Top Rank guys before looking Spence’s way.

But by 2019, those lesser options should be exhausted and we’d have a true super fight. How would it go? Right now, I’d lean towards Spence having a come from behind victory. Crawford has the superior footwork where he could control Spence by turning him and using that jab (southpaw and orthodox) to keep him from getting set to punch. However, Spence has great punch placement and a massive skill advantage when he gets inside. I see the naturally bigger Spence wearing Crawford down for a close but clear decision.

In the meantime, let’s continue to enjoy Spence’s path of destruction.

 

IsaacDogboe_title

The first title-winner of 2018 is a young lion from Ghana. Before his countrymen last night at the Bukom Boxing Arena, 23-year old Isaac Dogboe scored two knockdowns off left hooks to capture the WBO interim super bantamweight title.

MAKING THE VISITOR UNCOMFORTABLE: Many of you will remember Juarez for his Fight of the Year-level battle with Nonito Donaire back in 2015. He’s highly durable, a relentless stalker and bruising body puncher. Dogboe made a statement in the opening minute by starting fast and backing Juarez up with heavy left hooks and blows to the body. The phone-booth fighting stunned Juarez and made him give ground.

Dogboe couldn’t maintain this the entire opening round, but he didn’t need to. He imprinted o Juarez’s psyche that he could hurt him and it made the Mexican slugger a more hesitant when he got inside. That allowed the faster Dogboe to control the action from the backfoot and time counter left hooks.

EXPLOITING THE DEFENSIVE HOLES: The left hook counter hit paydirt in the second. Juarez was dropping his right hand when throwing left jabs and hooks, and Dogboe detonated a left hook on the jaw for the first knockdown. Juarez was hurt but able to withstand Dogboe’s follow-up shots.

The pattern replicated for the next three rounds with Juarez continuing to come forward, but unable to trap the Ghanian long enough to work the body and slow him down.

The end came in the fifth when Dogboe launched a perfect left hook on an incoming Juarez. The Mexican fighter had a delayed reaction and staggered aimlessly before crashing to his back. Juarez beat the count, but his dazed demeanor prompted referee Tony Weeks to halt the contest.

THE LION OF GHAHA: The win gives Dogboe the interim WBO super bantamweight title and makes him the mandatory for Jessie Magdaleno, who is looking for an opponent on a March 10 card at California’s StubHub Center. Dogboe wasted no time in the post-fight interview in declaring his availability for that date.

“Jessie Magdaleno, I’m coming for you, baby!” Dogboe vowed. “I know you’re gonna run, but the Lion of Ghana is here! The Pound 4 Pound king is here!”

The fight is a no-brainer in terms of excitement; it’s pitting two undefeated guys in their athletic primes together. However, I’m not sure if the money can be put together to get this done by March. Also, I could see Magdaleno, who last fought in April scoring a second-round TKO over Adeilson Dos Santos, wanting a tune-up before facing a hard-punching dynamo like Dogboe.

Pascal_Elbiali

If Jean Pascal is calling it a career, the former light-heavyweight champion is going out with a decisive win. What was supposed to be a launch-pad for Ahmed Elbiali turned into a slugfest with the stronger Pascal stopping an exhausted Elbiali in the sixth round.

The deciding factor was Pascal’s sustained body attack. Elbiali’s was content to hold while Pascal fired off haymaker hooks downstairs. From range, Pascal relied on his usual haymaker potshotting. He finally hit paydirt in the sixth with an overhand right that hurt Elibiali, who was too worn out from the body shots to hold or retreat. Pascal continued to tee off with the right until Elbiali’s corner threw in the towel at the 2:06 mark.

If Pascal’s retirement sticks, he finishes his career with a 32-5-1 (19 KOs) record.

Wilder vs Stiverne 2 - November 4_ 2017_11_04_2017_Fight_Ryan Hafey _ Premier Boxing Champions

Photo Credit: Ryan Haney/Premier Boxing Champions

BROOKLYN — Deontay Wilder said before last night’s rematch he feared for Bermane Stiverne’s life. Two minutes and 59 seconds later, we found out why as Stiverne failed to land a single punch and was on the receiving end of three knockdowns before being left motionless at the Barclays Center.

At 39 years old and having not fought in two years, most weren’t expecting much from Stiverne. Wilder wisely pounced on him early, showing a sharp jab. As Stiverne tried to plod in, his guard was split by an accurate straight right that put the former titlist on the seat of his pants. Any semblance of fighting spirit left Stiverne as he vainly claimed it was a rabbit punch. Wilder taunted him with a statue pose before unleashing two haymaker left and right hooks for another knockdown seconds later.

With under 10 seconds left, Wilder landing a sliding right hook and two left hooks that put Stiverne out cold against the bottom of the ropes.

Wilder’s win now gives him the distinction of knocking out every man he’s ever faced. In the post-fight interview, he challenged Anthony Joshua, who he accused of using performing enhancing drugs. Wilder also rebuffed the public offer from Joshua’s promoter Matchroom Boxing, who want him to face Dillian Whyte to earn a Joshua unification.Wilder did acquiesce that he would be willing to travel to the UK for Joshua.

Last night’s knockout was Wilder’s sixth successful defense of the WBC heavyweight title.

****

A good knockout can make you forget the details. Stiverne was a dead man walking the minute this fight was announced. Shopworn, 39 years old, and inactive for two years (and in his last fight, was dropped), Stiverne was facing a man in Wilder at the peak of his physical powers and it showed quickly.

But the fact Wilder scored a huge KO, and Joshua seemed to “struggle” a week ago vs. Carlos Takam, has led some to claim not only will Wilder win, but that AJ is ducking the American champion.

When comparing resumes, Joshua holds the clear advantage. If Wladimir Klitschko was washed up, then Stiverne was the walking dead. And even more ironic is that Wilder’s next opponent is likely Dominic Breazeale, a man Joshua easily knocked out in seven rounds last year.

Now make no mistake, the fight needs to happen to unify the division. But Wilder has to realize he has zero leverage. Last night’s win was not even a sellout, while Joshua easily filled and set an indoor boxing record of over 70,000 with a replacement opponent in Takam. Much like Canelo-GGG, Joshua has all the cards and can delay the fight or have Wilder jump through as many hoops as he pleases.

Don’t expect this fight to happen until late 2018, early 2019 at the latest.

 

Machado_Corrales

Photo Credit: Matt Heasley/ Golden Boy Promotions

VERONA, NY — Puerto Rico has a new world champion and a lineal one at that. Alberto Machado looked overmatched and outgunned before landing an eraser left hook to put down favorite Jezreel Corrales at the Turning Stone Casino.

Machado, who had never gone ten rounds nor faced a fighter of Corrales’ pedigree, struggled with his opponent’s explosiveness and wild attacks. But a glimmer of hope could be seen early on — Machado occasionally time a counter hook that would stop Corrales in his tracks.

It would be Machado who  first tasted the canvas in the fifth off a haymaker southpaw left. Machado weathered the storm and hurt Corrales badly with a short hook in the sixth. Corrales would hold on for the rest of the round, but the larger Machado extracted a price for this tactic by placing a forearm in Corrales’ throat every time.

After a tit for tat seventh with hard-fought but sloppy exchanges, Machado landed a short left hook that Corrales did not see coming. The champion slumped to the canvas and barely beat the count on unsteady legs. The referee ruled him unfit to canvas despite the protests.

After Corrales failed to make weight for this bout, I started to feel like maybe his Uchiyama victories were simply the result of being in the right place and at the right time against a declining champion. Since then he’s looked nothing like the guy some expected to be a force at super featherweight. He was floored twice by journeyman Robinson Castellanos and barely escaped with a technical decision win. Tonight, we was even more so reckless with his defense and attacks against Machado and it cost him dearly.

Corrales was vocal about wanting a rematch, but I don’t see how it’s feasible if he can’t make 130 safely. Plus, this bout wasn’t exactly eye-pleasing. The late exchanges and drama don’t make up for a first half mostly filled with awkward cliching and clumsy punching.

***

UNDERCARD RESULTS

Andrade_Fox

 

DEMETRIUS ANDRADE UD12 ALANTEZ FOX: Andrade’s career-reboot continued last night with a lopsided unanimous decision. Fox was severly outclassed, landing less than 60 punches over the entire fight. While not an exciting bout, it was one that showed why most observers feel Andrade has untapped potential: length, punch accuracy and an excellent jab from the southpaw stance. Outside of a questionable knockdown, Andrade dominated. This was the first time he’s fought twice in a calendar year since 2013, so to state he needs to keep active is an understatement. With HBO’s backing, I’m expecting Andrade to be in the mix for bouts against the 160 elite by this time next year.

***

RYAN BURNETT UD12 ZHANAT ZHAKIYANOV: This was a good fight to introduce U.S. fans to Ryan Burnett. The 25-year-old from Belfast, Ireland had a tough out against a bull of a fighter in Zhakiyanov, but the boxed well and battled in the trenches when necesssary. The scores rewarded his varied attack and skill (119-109, 118-110, 116-112). Now he’s a unified champion with the WBA and IBF super bantamweight titles. None of the top fighters in the division are locked up by the PBC or Showtime, so this is division, much like super flyweight, that HBO can showcase exclusively.

LR_WBSS-FIGHT NIGHT-GASSIEV VS WLODARCZYK-TRAPPFOTOS-10212017-3539

Photo Credit: Stephanie Trapp/ Ringstar Sports

NEWARK — Murat Gassiev ended the World Boxing Super Series quarter-finals with a crushing third round stoppage of Krzysztof Wlodarczyk at the Prudential Center.

Gassiev stalked his foe behind a tight guard from the opening bell. Wlodarczyk tried to implement a countering strategy off the backfoot, but his ponderous movement allowed Gassiev to cut the ring off and line up the right cross. With his opponent now focused on that punch, Gassiev uncorked a double left hook to the head and body that put Wlodarczyk flat on his face for the ten count.

“I had a great opponent tonight,” said Gassiev. “I prepared myself for a tough fight but it is boxing and anything can happen. We do a lot of work in the gym and I just listened to my coach round after round and he told me what I needed to do. That’s all I needed.”

Gassiev’s semi-final opponent is a fellow undefeated power-puncher and IBF titlist Yunier Dorticos, who knocked out Dmitry Kudryashov last month.

“Dorticos is a very good fighter with great experience,” said Gassiev. “He’s undefeated and I can’t wait to give all the boxing fans the big gift of a great fight against Dorticos.”

Dorticos, who believes Gassiev’s record is the product of weak opposition, vowed to add Gassiev’s WBA strap to his collection.

“I really wanted Gassiev to win, because he’s going to taste the power of a real man against me,” said Dorticos. “His opponent tonight was past his time. I’m ready to show him what a champion looks like and give him a challenge he’s never faced before. I want to take his belt. I want to get in the ring and destroy Gassiev.”

Gassiev improves his record to 25-0 (18 KOs). The semi-final unification matchup between Gassiev and Dorticos is targeted for early 2018.