Posts Tagged ‘Errol Spence’

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Photo Credit: Amanda Wescott/Showtime

BROOKLYN — The great thing about the truth is it’s uncompromising. Emotionless. That reality manifested last night at the Barclays Center in the form of Errol Spence Jr., who showed why he’s the most feared man in the welterweight division by breaking the will of Lamont Peterson over seven one-sided rounds.

With both men having fought once in the last year, the big question was who would show more ring rust and if Spence could handle the Jekyll-Hyde style of Peterson, who likes to apply heavy pressure after slow starts. Spence not only breezed through that test but revealed other truths which will be very concerning for the rest of the division.

CERTAIN DOOM: If you stand in front of Spence, bad things will happen. Peterson tried to wear out his foe by keeping a high guard and catching punches on the gloves and elbows. The problem was the southpaw Spence’s offense was too versatile; he alternated between shooting straight lefts to the pit of the stomach, uppercuts that split the gloves, and looping hooks around the guard. These shots kept Peterson hesitant to throw more than one counter at a time. And these were powerful, thudding shots you could tell were wearing down the reserves to prevent Peterson’s usual middle rounds comeback.

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YOU CAN’T SLUG YOUR WAY OUT: Peterson went down off a left hook to the top of the temple. The shot whipped around his guard and he didn’t see it coming. Peterson has been dropped eight times over the course of his 14-year. The Matthysse loss aside, he’s got up and prevented KO losses by turning the contest into brief slugfests. Last night, that strategy invited a worse beating for the D.C. challenger, who witnessed Spence smile and shrug off his best right hands to maul him with powerful hooks. When Peterson stumbled into the ropes, the beating continued with uppercuts and more hooks.

The severity of the punches and lack of Peterson return fire let us know this time would be different. There would be no last hurrahs for Peterson. The one remaining question was if his corner would be perceptive enough to realize when they needed to save Peterson from himself.

 

AN HONORABLE TRAINER: Peterson’s cornerman, Barry Hunter, is more than just a trainer. He was the man who took a teenage, homeless Peterson off the streets of Washington D.C. Father and son-like relationships don’t always lead to the best decisions in the heat of combat. Many times, the father figure “freezes” and either fails to give adequate instructions to his losing fighter or lets a beating go on for too long.

Hunter saw the writing on the wall early and told his man by the fifth he’d stop it if he couldn’t turn the fight around. The beating continued through the sixth and seventh, with a dejected Peterson telling Hunter that he couldn’t box him and his only hope was making it a slugfest. Hunter asked him if he wanted to stop it. And the prideful Peterson affirmed the hopelessness of the situation while still relying on his father figure to make the hurtful call.

“If you want to stop it, I understand. It’s your call.”

Having never heard anything close to that over Peterson’s career, Hunter knew his man had enough.

WELTERWEIGHT SUPREMACY IS UPON US: In his post-fight interview, Spence affirmed his desire for a unification showdown with WBC title-holder Keith Thurman, whom he derisively referred to as “Sometimes Thurman.” The match is one of the biggest showdown in the division and between two undefeated, prime fighters both under the PBC banner. To this date, Thurman has been non-committal and appeared comfortable with letting the fight “marinate” until 2019. The public won’t allow that, and there’s nothing that can happen between now and 2019 that would suddenly make either of them pay-per-view stars.

Its actually fights like Spence-Thurman that can catapult a fighter into becoming an pay-per-view attraction. Spence has the ambition to bet on himself and take the risk now. Does Thurman?

THE REAL SUPERFIGHT FOR 2019: If there’s any fight that I would accept waiting next year for, it would be Spence taking on Terence Crawford, who has his own welterweight title shot in April when he takes on WBO title-holder Jeff Horn. With Crawford under Top Rank and Spence with Al Haymon, the promotional rift will keep them separated for some time. Should Spence beat Thurman, he would still have guys like Danny Garcia and Shawn Porter to tangle with. And Crawford can feast on the endless list of WBO mandatories and Top Rank guys before looking Spence’s way.

But by 2019, those lesser options should be exhausted and we’d have a true super fight. How would it go? Right now, I’d lean towards Spence having a come from behind victory. Crawford has the superior footwork where he could control Spence by turning him and using that jab (southpaw and orthodox) to keep him from getting set to punch. However, Spence has great punch placement and a massive skill advantage when he gets inside. I see the naturally bigger Spence wearing Crawford down for a close but clear decision.

In the meantime, let’s continue to enjoy Spence’s path of destruction.

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Photo Credit: Ed Diller/Di Bella Entertainment

BROOKLYN — Watch the live stream weigh-in for Saturday’s IBF welterweight title match between Errol Spence Jr. (22-0, 19 KOs) and Lamont Peterson (35-3-1, 17 KOs). The bout is Spence’s first defense of the title he won last May by stopping Kell Brook in 11 rounds. Peterson is competing in his first bout since defeating David Avanesyan by unanimous decision last February. The fight airs on Showtime January 20 at 9 p.m.

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The Truth has arrived. Errol Spence Jr. lived up to his nickname by silencing critics (myself included) by overcoming an early deficit to batter Kell Brook into an 11th round stoppage and claim the IBF welterweight title.

The fight was fought on a very high level. Early on, Brook held the advantage when he kept the challenger at long-range and on the end of his right hand and jabs. But Spence would force the action and remain relentless in clubbing the body. The biggest difference over the first half was Brook had a better grasp of ring generalship; he knew when to pick his spots on offense and smother Spence’s attempts to respond. Through six, I had Brook with a 4-2 lead.

Then things started going south for the Sheffield native. Brook’s punch output dissipated drastically as Spence’s accuracy and pressure gradually increased every round. Now Brook was a step slower in clinching, allowing Spence to work the body and land punishing jabs.

By the eighth, bad swelling surrounded Brook’s left eye. The toll of making the 147 limit from welterweight, in addition to Spence’s pressure and body-punching, had Brook’s resistance withering by the minute. There was nowhere to hide as the challenger punished Brook with blistering power shots whenever the champion sought refuge on the ropes. Brook was forced to take a knee in the 10th and was on the verge of being stopped before a dramatic late rally got him through the round.

Spence promptly continued his workmanlike assault in the 11th. Brook once again took a knee, later claiming the left eye damage had badly compromised his vision. This time, his corner wisely saved him from further punishment.


If you’re a top welterweight not named Errol Spence, tonight performance has put you on notice. The most impressive thing for me was Spence’s defense, which I had previously underrated. He proved to an elusive, small target and took away the potency of Brook’s right hand.

WBA/WBC champion Keith Thurman, who’s currently recovering from elbow surgery, wasted no time responding to Spence’s unification challenge.

Although many see Spence as the future kingpin of the division, Thurman has a good chance of derailing it. One Time is highly athletic and has the footwork needed to keep Spence from getting set and also exploding with flashy and damaging combos. However, we know Spence’s specialty is body-punching and Thurman has been hurt badly twice from shots downstairs against Luiz Collazo and Shawn Porter. Ideally, a Spence and Thurman unification should be one of PBC’s major fights in early 2018.

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What’s next for Kell Brook? A LONG break. He has suffered orbital bone fractures to both eyes in his last two fights. A titanium plate had to be inserted into the right one after the brutal defeat to Gennady Golovkin last year. The same procedure will likely be required for the left eye that Spence smashed tonight. The eyes will be targets from here on out, and Brook’s best bet would be to take the rest of the year off and cash out with an all-Sheffield showdown against Amir Khan in spring 2018.

As for Spence, there’s no need to sit around while Thurman convalesces. Luis Collazo or the winner for the just announced Robert Guerrero vs. Omar Figueroa (assuming they don’t kill each other) bout would be solid stay-busy fights to close out the year.

Whatever Spence does, you can be rest assured we’ll all be watching very closely.

 

 

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IBF welterweight titlist Kell Brook and Errol Spence exchanged pleasantries for the first time at today’s UK press conference for their May 27 showdown. Brook is returning to welterweight to defend his belt after a moving up two weight classes to face middleweight champion Gennady Golovkin last year. Spence is receiving his first title shot following a sixth round KO of Leonard Bundu last August.

From the assorted trash talk, the most interesting thing to note is Spence’s camp repeatedly telling Brook to make weight. This could be a legitimate concern as Brook outweighed Golovkin on fight night.

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BROOKLYN — Errol Spence out the welterweight division on notice with a thorough destruction of Chris Algieri tonight on NBC’s edition of Premier Boxing Champions.

The fight was no contest from the opening bell. Spence abused Algieri with body shots and forced exchanges, resulting in Algieri being the receiving end of jarring southpaw left hands. It was that counter shot that produced a discolored bruise under Algieri’s right eye and a knockdown in the fourth.

Unlike the knockdowns suffered against Manny Pacquiao, Spence remained composed and continued working the body and crowding Algieri. Trapped on the ropes, Algieri was baited into throwing counter shots just to survive. This allowed Spence to crash home a vicious left hook that put Algieri on the seat on his pants and forced the referee stoppage.

The win cements Spence’s position as the #1 contender for IBF titlist Kell Brook. Spence made it known he’s looking to make that fight in addition to challenging his stablemates in the PBC.

The win is Spence’s third straight knockout and extends his record to 20-0 (17 KOs). Algieri falls to 21-3 (8 KOs) with three losses in his last four fights.

UNDERCARD RESULTS


MARCUS BROWNE SD8 RADIVOJE KALAJDZIC: Browne got the victory but failed to impress in the first real test of his career. He was credited a dubious knockdown in the first when Kalajdzic slipped. Browne suffered the first knockdown of his career when Kalajdzic blasted him with a right hand in the sixth. From that moment, Browne spent the rest of the fight doing more holding than punching. The referee failed to give him a hard warning for these tactics and Browne escaped with a split decision victory (76-74, 74-74, 76-75).


KRZYZTOF GLOWACKI UD12 STEVE CUNNINGHAM: The 39 year old Cunningham put on another great display of heart, but didn’t have to durability to handle Glowacki’s power. Cunningham went down twice in the second, and had a big momentum killer when he was dropped in the 10th. Outside the knockdowns, Cunningham was very competitive by being aggressive and using his quick hands to beat Glowacki to the punch. Despite the knockdown, “USS” had his greatest success in the 10th when he briefly stunned Glowacki with a counter right hand.

At 39 years old and multiple wars on his ledger, this would be a good time for Cunningham to consider retirement.

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Photo Credit: Ed Diller/ Dibella Entertainment

BROOKLYN – Headliners Errol Spence and Chris Algieri are phenomenal shape for tomorrow’s NBC clash for Premier Boxing Champions. Spence weighed in at 146.4, his lowest tally since 2013. He’s coming off a fifth round stoppage of Alejandro Barrera last November. Algieri, who took a 10 round unanimous decision over Erik Bone in December, tipped the scales at 145.6.

Rounding out the TV card are Krzysztof Glowacki (199) vs. Steve Cunningham (199.2) for the WBO cruiserweight title, Marcus Browne (174.6) vs. Radivoje Kalajdzic (173.6), and an opener featuring Mario Barrios (135.6) vs. Edgar Gabejan (132.2). Also in action will be local favorite Heather Hardy (123.2) taking on Anna Hultin (123).

The card airs Saturday on NBC at 8:30 p.m. ET.

RealBoxingTalk

On this edition of Real Boxing Talk, trainer Stephen “Breadman” Edwards and I discussed a myriad of topics from the boxing landscape. We reviewed the looming title shot between his fighter Julian “J Rock” Williams and Jermall Charlo, Canelo-Khan, Errol Spence vs. Chris Algieri, Berto-Ortiz II, fighters missing weight, and more. Listen to the entire show below.