Posts Tagged ‘The Main Ingredient’

TheMainIngredient

Music fans the world over were saddened by Thursday’s news on the passing of Main Ingredient lead singer Cuba Gooding Sr. Today, we here at BeatsBoxingMayhem salute the man and his legacy by highlighting his group’s most important samples in Hip-Hop.

QUIET BEGINNINGS

Formed in Harlem in 1964, the group originally featured a lineup of Donald McPheron (lead singer), Luther Simmons Jr. and Tony Silvester. The trio went through several names changes (The Poets, The Insiders) before settling on The Main Ingredient in 1968, picking a name inspired by the label of a Coke bottle.

After bouncing around a few labels, the group began making noise in 1970 with the Top 30 hit “You’ve Been My Inspiration.” The song powered the group’s debut project LTD. Decades later, the album cut “Magic Shoes” found new life as the opening sounds of the classic Main Source 1992 single “Fakin’ the Funk,” and Little Brother’s “On the Way.”

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9th Wonder continued digging in the trio’s catalogue and chopped up the beginning of “Baby Change Your Mind,” off their third album Black Seeds.

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LINEUP CHANGE

MainIngredient_BitterSweet

Success was soon mired by immense tragedy in 1971 when lead singer Don McPherson died from leukemia. Gooding Sr., who had previously sung background vocals for the group, was selected as the replacement to accompany Luther Simmons and Tony Silvester.

The decision had immediate dividends with their biggest hit in “Everybody Plays the Fool.” The song hit #2 on the R&B chart and #3 on pop, powering the album Bitter Sweet for their first Top 10 project. Emcees such as Heavy D, Memphis Bleek and Kool G Rap would create drastically different songs with the original’s easygoing production.

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MainIngredient_Afrodisiac

The next album, Afrodisiac, is notable for recruiting a powerhouse writing and production team that included George Clinton and Stevie Wonder. For Hip-Hop fans, the track “Something ‘Bout Love” is most notable for providing the backdrop to the Fugees’ “Cowboys.”

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MainIngredient_EuphratesRiver

1974’s Euphrates River produced the platinum single “Just Don’t Want to Be Lonely.” The heavy opening bassline would be tweaked by Eminem for his “Mosh” single.

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Producer Easy Mo Bee would combine the opening seconds from “California My Way” and a fleeting but recurring melody from “Summer Breeze” (9 second mark) for Ready To Die’s “Things Done Changed.”

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MainIngredient_ShameOntheWorld

In 1975, the group released the album Shame On the World and caught the ear of Alchemist and Kanye West on “Let Me Prove My Love to You.” The former focused on the 13 second mark to craft “The First to Drop a Beat…,” while Ye hit up the 1:46 portion to give Alicia Keys one of her most soulful records.

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mainIngredient_gooding

Main Ingredient would record five more albums over the next 30 years, the last being 2001’s Pure Magic. Gooding would also release 3 solo albums. We here at BeatsBoxingMayhem send our condolences to the Gooding family. The music and legacy lives on.

 

 

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“You gon’ learn today…”

DJ Omega and Ty Kidd are blessing crate diggers early this year with a 49-song collection of samples from Wale’s career. Instead of testing your knowledge, these guys make things easier by blending the original with Wale’s rendition. From Phil Collins and Aretha Franklin to Angela Bofill and Kut Klose, this tape is a great offering of decades worth of music history. Check the few samples beflow before downloading.

THE MOMENTS X WALE “GIRLS/BACK YARD BAND/PRETTY GIRLS”

ANGELA BOFILL X WALE “TIME TO SAY GOODBYE

PAUL MCCARTNEY X WALE X MMG “JET/SELF-MADE”

MIXTAPE DOWNLOAD

Those who were online for Christmas got a nice treat with DJ Premier’s blog dropped this exclusive sitdown interview with Premier and Pete Rock. Based on the hotel setting and Japanese word characters, this interview likely took place during an overseas stop. Premier reveals how he literally fell into Gang Starr when the emcee of his previous group blindsided him by enrolling in the Navy. He details the differences between the album and single versions of “Words That I Manifest,” and a violent altercation at label Wild Pitch over his contract. On Pete Rock’s end, he reviews his creative process on what many consider his best work, the remix to Public Enemy’s “Shut ‘Em Down.” Pete also gives great info on one of his other undisputed classic in “T.R.O.Y.”

Grab a snack, because both legends reflect for a full hour! This is invaluable info from two of the master producers in Hip-Hop history. Mandatory viewing.